Nelson Mandela and Malcolm X. Candy Store. 

In ?Chi-Raq? there still is not one trauma unit, despite the fact that the city leads the country in the number of homicides, with the majority occurring south of the Loop. As often follows with arrests, incarceration tends to ensue. As a result, more than 100,000 people go through the doors of Chicago?s Cook County Jail each year. However, many of these young men and women are blind to how the city?s methodical and systematic control of land, divides their neighborhoods into war zones. This, results in wars with each other, in a seemingly endless loop of ?survival?.

Although the violence is consistently reported in the news, to understand what?s at stake we must look far deeper than the latest crime scene. It?s vital that we also show the immense waste of human potential that?s being lost with each violent act. While the violence that has spread to many of Chicago?s most economically depressed neighborhoods is in all ways real, the never ending focus on the violence obscures a larger and far more significant truth: that the wholesale neglect has led to the practical destruction of these communities. 

The combination of the large scale industrial meltdown, political disinvestment, and the failure of the war on poverty during the 1970?s and 80?s led to communities like Chicago?s South Side falling on extremely hard times. Today, the failure of the war on poverty is clearly evident. The poverty rate for the majority African-Americans stands at 32.6 percent, the highest for the ten largest American cities, according to Chicago Muckrakers. The aftermath is evidenced by failing schools, inadequate public healthcare, mass foreclosures in the form of abandoned and decaying buildings, widespread, but rarely seen hunger, drug use, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and unusually high levels of social violence, incarceration rates and police brutality. 

Barack Obama?s rise on the South Side from community organizer to leader of the free world has been both uplifting and disheartening. Obama?s 2008 narrative of collective change resonated strongly with the largest African-American community in the country and unfortunately, once in office he has done little to address the economic and social challenges that the communities face. This may be changing as Obama is literally being forced to contend with the widespread issues of violence both in his hometown and throughout the country. He's pushing for gun control reform.
#Resist Collection

RESIST by Jon Lowenstein | SOS South Side, USA, 2012

449.00

© Jon Lowenstein / NOOR

'A fundamental concern for others in our individual and community lives would go a long way in making the world the better place we so passionately dreamt of.' - Nelson Mandela 

'While this picture is subdued - the subjects of the photograph were anything but subdued. Each man represented a passion for humanity that was unbridled and displayed through their ultimate sacrifice that heart, ideals and a willingness to put your life on the line for a cause is what a human life is to be measured by.' - Jon Lowenstein

Details:

  • Fine Art Baryta, paper size A3
  • Open Edition
  • NOOR Authentic Stamp on the verso
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 Nelson Mandela and Malcolm X. Candy Store. 

In ?Chi-Raq? there still is not one trauma unit, despite the fact that the city leads the country in the number of homicides, with the majority occurring south of the Loop. As often follows with arrests, incarceration tends to ensue. As a result, more than 100,000 people go through the doors of Chicago?s Cook County Jail each year. However, many of these young men and women are blind to how the city?s methodical and systematic control of land, divides their neighborhoods into war zones. This, results in wars with each other, in a seemingly endless loop of ?survival?.

Although the violence is consistently reported in the news, to understand what?s at stake we must look far deeper than the latest crime scene. It?s vital that we also show the immense waste of human potential that?s being lost with each violent act. While the violence that has spread to many of Chicago?s most economically depressed neighborhoods is in all ways real, the never ending focus on the violence obscures a larger and far more significant truth: that the wholesale neglect has led to the practical destruction of these communities. 

The combination of the large scale industrial meltdown, political disinvestment, and the failure of the war on poverty during the 1970?s and 80?s led to communities like Chicago?s South Side falling on extremely hard times. Today, the failure of the war on poverty is clearly evident. The poverty rate for the majority African-Americans stands at 32.6 percent, the highest for the ten largest American cities, according to Chicago Muckrakers. The aftermath is evidenced by failing schools, inadequate public healthcare, mass foreclosures in the form of abandoned and decaying buildings, widespread, but rarely seen hunger, drug use, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and unusually high levels of social violence, incarceration rates and police brutality. 

Barack Obama?s rise on the South Side from community organizer to leader of the free world has been both uplifting and disheartening. Obama?s 2008 narrative of collective change resonated strongly with the largest African-American community in the country and unfortunately, once in office he has done little to address the economic and social challenges that the communities face. This may be changing as Obama is literally being forced to contend with the widespread issues of violence both in his hometown and throughout the country. He's pushing for gun control reform.